Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Understanding Richard Dawkins's controverisal "mild" tweets in under one minute

Trigger warnings or something: sexual assault, including on children.

A short, poignant, Socratic thought experiment to clarify two of Richard Dawkins's recent controversial tweets by exposing important nuance in an issue that isn't exactly black and white. Play at your own risk. Abusive, inappropriate, and disruptive commentary, deemed by my sole and personal discretion, will not be tolerated on this post.


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Imagine you've been captured by a sadistic maniac, and he insists you will be sexually assaulted. But to make it more fun for him, he demands you choose the manner of your own rape, provided only that whatever you choose is truly unwelcome to you, on threat of far worse if you abstain or try to cheat. What would you choose?
Congratulations, you now understand "mild rape."
Pause for a moment to decide if you are condoning rape by choosing any possible outcome that recognizes that there are, indeed, worse possibilities.
Congratulations, you now understand Richard Dawkins's "mild rape" tweet.

Now replace yourself in the above scenario with any child who is to be sexually assaulted in some way. This child need not necessarily be your own. For purposes of the thought experiment, the choice is yours, knowing it defaults to worse than the absolute worst thing you can imagine for the child if you abstain or try to cheat. What do you do?
Congratulations, you now understand "mild pedophilia."
Pause for a moment to decide if you are condoning the sexual assault of the child by choosing any possible outcome that recognizes that there are, indeed, worse possibilities.

Congratulations, you now understand Richard Dawkins's "mild pedophilia" tweet.
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Post script: If you remain angry at the use of the word mild for something you feel is universally horrible, I hear you. Within the universe of [universally horrible thing], though, what word other than "mild" applies to the least severe end of the spectrum of its possible manifestations?

Nota bene: The point of this exercise was not to explain why Richard Dawkins chose the examples that he did, neither to defend nor excoriate those choices. That's a separate matter. I urge you to read Michael Nugent's recent, short, and levelheaded post on the entire matter, which touches upon those issues amongst other important, germane ones, including the very big point, "But yesterday has also shown yet again how some people can use online media to unfairly harm the reputation of a good person."


Edit: The wording of this post has been altered from its original very slightly to increase clarity by removing a superfluous parenthetical.

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